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If you’re one of those folks that enjoys doing Christmas right the whole way, you may find yourself cutting down your own tree this year. A time old tradition that too many people take for granted. But if it’s your firs time, you’re probably wondering where in the heck you can go to do such a thing! Don’t worry, because I got your back. Here’s 7 places where you can go get your Christmas on, Little House on the Prairie style.


Tammen Treeberry Farm

Tammen gets right to the point, the give you a saw and send you on your way. All you got to do is bear with the winter temperatures to search for and cut down your own tree. This is more of a no-frills experience with plenty of pines and firs to choose from. All trees $55, $7 additional for shaking and baling. Opens Nov 24, 8am–4:30pm daily.

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Richardson Adventure Farm

Richardson Adventure Farm offers a full blown holiday experience for it’s patrons. Not only do they supply your tree, the popular seasonal destination also hooks it up with complimentary hot chocolate and coffee inside their large indoor heated sales barn. On weekends, you can catch a free wagon ride to haul your tree back to the barn while you munch on homemade kettle corn and freshly baked doughnuts, yum! Cut your own trees, $68. Pre-cut trees and small trees individually priced. Opens Nov 24, 9am–6pm daily

Pioneer Tree Farm

Hit up the country scene by shopping for your tree at this farm in McHenry, Illinois. The trees are grown organically by the owners and volunteers, they don’t use any pesticides whatsoever. And 10 percent of sales donated to Environmental Defenders of McHenry County. All trees $50, cash or check only. Opens Nov 24 at 9am.

Pine-Apple Farm

The hidden gem in Cary is the most basic of tree farms, they have saws, and offer shaking and baling. They’re more popularly known for their stock of Fraser firs, trees with good needle retention. That saves you the clean up in the living room corner. Pines $65, firs and spruces $85. Opens Nov 24, Sat–Sun 9am–4pm

Oney’s Tree Farm

Oney’s is a historic sight in general. It is the oldest and largest tree farm in Northern Illinois. Patrons can choose between nine types of trees, while riding a horse-drawn wagon among the fields. After you’ve carefully selected the perfect pine, make a pit stop Mrs. Claus at her North Pole house. Make sure you have a whole day to spend here because the bakery with fresh goods and lunch items is a must see. Less than 5 feet, $30. Pines 5–9 feet, $55. Spruces and firs 5–9 feet, $65. 9–14 feet, $10 per foot. Nov 25–Dec 11, 9am–4pm.

Camelot Christmas Tree Farm

Who doesn’t want to come home saying you cut down a tree from Camelot? You’d be the hero of Christmas. The tree farm opens for the season on Black Friday with plenty of offers. You can choose from eight types of trees—firs and spruces and pines. If you want to get your hands dirty, you can choose your tree and cut it down. Should you want to skip out on the hard labor, you can purchase a pre-cut Christmas tree. There’s wreaths, roping and swags also available for purchase, as well as free shaking and bailing, too. But don’t miss out on sitting inside the warm hut with hot chocolate and cookies that will make you feel like Santa himself. All trees $60, cash or check only. Opens Nov 24 at 9am.

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Ben’s Christmas Tree Farm

Ben’s astonishing firs and pines have been around since 1982. Making them a pro in the business. You have plenty of choices between nine different types. Not just a good product, the people that work there also are kind enough to provide you with the tools you need to cut down your fine tree and take it straight home for the holiday season. Don’t leave without the complimentary coffee and hot cocoa, or take a ride on the horse-drawn wagon. The cost of the tree is $6–$9 per foot. Cash or check only. They are open Nov 24–Dec 17, Fri–Sun.

Cutting down your own Christmas tree this year? Here’s where you can go in the Chicago area Wikipedia
Mariana writes for Rare Chicago.
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