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Former “Jeopardy!” winner Stephanie Jass has been charged with two felony counts for allegedly “hacking” into her co-workers.

Jass, 47, appeared on the famed game show in 2012, where she set a record for being the first woman to win seven consecutive games, before her streak was beaten by Julia Collins in 2014. She returned in 2013 for the show’s “Tournament of Champions” series, which pits past winners against each other, and again in 2014 for the show’s “Battle of the Decades,” according to J! Archive.


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A history professor, Jass allegedly accessed the email accounts of her co-workers at Adrian College, small Michigan college. She stopped working at the school some time ago, but representatives refused to comment, reports Fox News.

During an interview with Alex Trebek on “Jeopardy!” Jass shared her methods for teaching her history classes, which included role playing games.

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The investigation into Jass was launched after staff complained to higher-ups, and enough digital evidence was reportedly discovered to file charges.

The school issued a statement about the allegations:

Adrian College wants to sincerely thank the Michigan State Police and the Lenawee County Prosecutor’s Office for their thorough investigation and for ultimately bringing charges in this crime. Privacy rights are a fundamental principle of our American democracy, and Adrian College stands with those who protect these rights.

Jass faces a potential of five years in prison and a whopping $10,000 fine for her alleged cyber crimes. If she’s found guilty, her “Jeopardy!” winnings will definitely come in handy — she won a total of $147,570 in her first run on the game show, and J! Archive lists thousands more in winnings from her returns to the show.

Christabel is a twenty-something graduate from Virginia Commonwealth University. She's a big fan of writing, television, movies, general pop culture and complaining about how they've annoyed her. Long live the Oxford comma.
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