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Australia has some of the most beautiful landscapes and seascapes in the world — and some of the deadliest animals in existence inhabiting it. Here are ten of the life forms you don’t want to encounter on a trip Down Under.

1. Saltwater crocodile

Rex, a five-meter (15-foot) 700 kilogram (1,543-pound) saltwater crocodile, snaps up a rabbit during feeding at Wildlife Sydney Zoo in Sydney Monday, March 3, 2014. Crocodiles are often referred to as nature’s ultimate killing machine capable of unleashing the strongest bite force of any animal on the planet. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith)


Scientific name: Crocodylus porosus

Method of death: Biting

Found: Northern Australia (and across the Indo-Pacific region)

About: The largest reptile on earth, saltwater crocodiles can be up to 20 feet long and weigh up to 3,000 pounds. With the capability to swim up to 18 miles per hour in bursts, these crocodiles can be very dangerous. They can kill animals as big as water buffalo, and are believed to have the strongest bite of any animal. (Photo: Associated Press)

2. Sydney Funnel Web Spider

Australia's Deadliest Animals

Scientific name: Atrax robustus

Method of death: Poison administered by bites

Found: Within about a 60-mile radius of Sydney.

About: There’s the Opera House, beautiful beaches, world-class food — you knew there had to be a down side to visiting Sydney, right? This spider can be up to two inches in diameter. When they are threatened, they rear up on their hind legs and display their fangs, which can pierce a shoe. Effects from the spider’s bite can be felt within 30 minutes. There is an antivenom. (Photo: Getty Images)

3. Stone Fish

Australia's Deadliest Animals

Scientific name: Synanceia verrucosa

Method of death: Venomous spines along the dorsal side

Found: Can be seen on reefs, camouflaged as a rock, or on beaches. They can stay alive out of water for up to 24 hours.

About: The stone fish is generally regarded as the most poisonous fish in the ocean. The harder someone steps on one, the more venom is released into the wound. The fish aren’t aggressive, but they will stick up the poisonous spines along their back if they feel threatened. There is an antivenom. (Photo: Getty Images)

4. Blue-ringed octopus

BlueRingedOctopus

Scientific name: Hapalochlaena

Method of death: Poison, administered by biting

Found: Tide pools and coral reefs

About: This is one creature you don’t want to make angry. This octopus produces a poison that is 1,200 times deadlier than cyanide. Death can result in minutes if they bite, and there is no known antivenom. They are generally docile, but if it is agitated, its skin will darken and the colorful rings will become more pronounced. (Photo: Noodlefish / Flickr)

5. Redback Spider

Australia's Deadliest Animals

Scientific name: Latrodectus hasseltii

Method of death: Poison, administered by biting

Found: Across the continent in virtually every environment

About: The redback is the spider behind the majority of all antivenom treatments in Australia, with between 2,000 to 10,000 cases annually. The female is responsible for virtually all bites that require venom. It can be difficult to diagnose a redback bite, as they are less than half-an-inch across. One in three people can have serious side effects, including death. There is an antivenom. (Photo: Getty Images)

6. Inland Taipan

Inland Taipan Close up

Scientific name: Oxyuranus microlepidotus

Method of death: Poison, administered by biting

Found: The plains where Queensland and South Australia meet

About: Taipans hunt warm-blooded mammals, and their venom is one of the most powerful poisons in the world. One bite has the toxicity to kill 100 grown men, and a bite can kill a victim in as little as 30 minutes if left untreated. The snake can bite as many as eight times in one attack. There is an antivenom. (Photo: Doc. Di0 / Flickr)

7. Box Jellyfish

BoxJellyfish

Scientific name: Chironex fleckeri

Method of death: Stinging tentacles

Found: Coastal areas, such as the Great Barrier Reef

About: The biggest box jellyfish are about a foot in diameter, with around 60 tentacles that can each grow nearly 10 feet long. The poison causes cells to leak potassium, which can kill people in as little as two minutes. There is no known anti-venom, but flushing with vinegar is the most common way to relieve some of the pain. (Photo: Creative Commons)

8. Eastern Brown Snake

EasternBrownSnake

Scientific name: Pseudonaja textilis

Method of death: Venom, delivered through biting

Found: Along the east coast of Australia from Cape York to South Australia.

About: It’s considered the second most venomous land snake, but number two tries harder. Eastern brown snakes are active during the day, and they are known for their speed and aggression. They generally grow up to six feet in length (but can be larger). There is an antivenom. (Photo: Creative Commons)

9. Great White Shark

GANSBAAI, SOUTH AFRICA - JULY 08: A Great White Shark swims in Shark Alley near Dyer Island on July 8, 2010 in Gansbaai, South Africa. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

Scientific name: Carcharodon carcharias

Method of death: Biting

Found: Around Australia, great whites are found in a range extending from central Queensland, around the southern coastline, and up to the North West Cape in Western Australia.

About: If you’ve seen Jaws, you know how this works. Great Whites, like many of the other animals on this list, are protected in Australia. Studies have shown a downward trend in their numbers over the last 60 years, but because of a limited ability to track the numbers, it isn’t clear how many great whites are left. (Photo: Getty Images)

10. Geographic Cone Snail

GeographicConeSnail

Scientific name: Conus geographus

Method of death: Venom administered through a harpoon-like tooth

Found: Coral reefs

About: Geography cone snails often release insulin in a cloud to stun their prey before administering a venom strong enough to induce serious paralysis in humans with a tiny dosage. Many cone snails are considered poisonous, but geography cones are the most dangerous. There is no antivenom. (Photo: Creative Commons

A large Golden Orb Spider crawls on Borisat's face, a Sydney Wildlife World Keeper in Sydney, Australia. The park is holding a survey to establish which animals people find most creepy: snakes or spiders. A poll reveals that most people (87 percent) would not know how to identify a dangerous snake or spider if they saw one, even though Australia has five of the top 10 most deadly snakes and spiders in the world. (Rob Griffith / Associated Press)
A large Golden Orb Spider crawls on Borisat’s face, a Sydney Wildlife World Keeper in Sydney, Australia. The park is holding a survey to establish which animals people find most creepy: snakes or spiders. A poll reveals that most people (87 percent) would not know how to identify a dangerous snake or spider if they saw one, even though Australia has five of the top 10 most deadly snakes and spiders in the world. (Rob Griffith / Associated Press)
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