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Reince Priebus is out as President Trump’s chief of staff. Priebus, who previously led the Republican National Committee, represented the establishment GOP faction of the Trump White House. There were widespread reports that Priebus was feuding with chief strategist Steve Bannon, who represents the populist wave that propelled Trump into the Oval Office.

The announcement comes only a day after The New Yorker published an obscenity-ridden interview with Trump’s new communications director, Anthony Scaramucci. In that interview, Scaramucci stated, “Reince is a fucking paranoid schizophrenic, a paranoiac” and said that the chief of staff “will resign soon.” He has also accused Priebus of leaking to the press. The animosity between the two White House staffers was so bad that two long-time friends of Scaramucci confirmed to The Daily Beast that the communications director refers to Priebus as “Reince Penis.”


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President Trump made the big announcement on Twitter Friday afternoon, writing, “I am pleased to inform you that I have just named General/Secretary John F Kelly as White House Chief of Staff…he has been a true star of my administration.” Minutes later, the president tweeted “I would like to thank Reince Priebus for his service and dedication to his country. We accomplished a lot together and I am proud of him!” CNN reports that Priebus privately resigned on Thursday.

The new chief of staff is John F. Kelly who was previously the Homeland Security Secretary.

Both Priebus and Scaramucci traveled with Trump New York, where he spoke on Friday. Politico’s White House reporter sent out a tweet of the pair after they exited Air Force One, writing they “didn’t interact when they landed.”

According to Dave Weigel, a politics editor at the Washington Post, Priebus is now the short-serving chief of staff, beating out Ken Duberstein who led the Reagan White House from 1988 to 1989.

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