Alexandra Curtis

Home | View All Winners
Alberto Altamirano Alexandra Curtis Ariel Winter Barbara Pierce Bush BT Urruela Celeste Currie Chris Mintz Diana Kim George McGraw Guy Benson Holly Holm Justin Amash Lucius Marah Lidey Mary Katharine Ham Mason Wartman Mohammed Shaker Orlando Watson Phil Klay Sadie Robertson Seth Jordan Tulsi Gabbard Vincent Harris Wesley Lowery

When Alexandra “Allie” Curtis isn’t attending graduate classes at Brown University or competing in Miss America pageants, she’s inspiring women – young and old – across the country.


Curtis has been a local titleholder in the Miss America Organization for the past three years and has been dedicated in promoting her platform, “Leading Ladies: Equipping Young Women with the Skills to Lead.” The goal of her platform is to encourage women to pursue leadership positions and thrive in industries where they’ve been historically underrepresented.

Curtis says she has always wanted to pursue a career in public service.

“When I began my undergraduate career, I realized there is a gender gap, and gender-based difficulties for women serving in local, state and federal government, which is reflected on many college campuses across the country,” she told Rare. “It became my goal to help encourage and support women with leadership ambitions in college and help build a pipeline of women who will be dedicated to public service well beyond their college years.”

The Syracuse University graduate was able to bring the first “Elect Her: Campus Women Win” training to her school as an undergraduate. She created and implemented women’s leadership week her senior year, and was awarded a selective grant from her chancellor to continue the Elect Her programming.

After graduating in 2014, she continued to promote “Leading Ladies” by speaking to schools and Girl Scout troops. She served as a Star Fellow for Running Start, a non-partisan, non-profit organization that brings young women to politics. Curtis had the opportunity to speak at the Young Women’s Political Leadership Summit about gender identity in politics.

“I have been thrilled to help other young women run for leadership positions on their campuses, and win,” she told Rare. “I am thankful that I have had the opportunity to spread my message about leadership to others.”

Though she has always been inspired by public service, Curtis is particularly touched by Congresswomen Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) and Elise Stefanik (R-NY).

“I am ecstatic to see two young women serving at such a prominent level of public office,” she told Rare. “They are both a living testament that women – and young women – are vital voices in the leadership of our nation.”

Curtis is ready for what 2016 has in store.

“As I close the door on several chapters in my life and start upon new endeavors, I will continue my work with young women,” she told Rare.

After Curtis graduates from Brown University, she plans to get a master of science in homeland security with a focus on cybersecurity at Salve Regina University. She will complete her year of service as Miss Rhode Island in May 2016.

“Leadership isn’t about a title – it’s about service, and there is no shortage of service to others in our world,” she told Rare. “No matter what 2016 throws at me, I am looking forward to taking on new opportunities and endeavors with the same grit and determination that has made me the woman I am today.”