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Fearing for their safety more than ever under an incoming Donald Trump administration, members of the LGBT community across the nation are showing an increased interest in LGBT gun rights group Pink Pistols, an organization that claims it is “dedicated to the legal, safe and responsible use of firearms for self-defense of the sexual-minority community.”

With the horrific Orlando night club shooting that killed 49 people still fresh and the election of a presidential candidate, whose campaign revolved around fear-mongering toward minorities just behind us, the Pink Pistols organization says they have seen a dramatic spike in chapter growth as well as on social media, according to The Blaze.


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Pink Pistols spokeswoman Gwendolyn Patton told TheBlaze on Thursday that some in the LGBT community are worried that they could be targets of hate incidents under a Trump administration.

“I personally don’t believe he’s given any indication that he’s unfriendly” to the community, Patton said. In fact, Trump has indicated that he “wants to defend us from people who want to throw us off buildings or hang us from cranes,” she said, citing his response to the Orlando massacre.

Trump also backed the Supreme Court’s ruling on legalizing same-sex marriage, calling it “fine” when he appeared on “60 Minutes.”

Since the Orlando attack, the Pink Pistols’ Facebook likes have increased from around 1,500 to well over 9,100, and around 15 new Pink Pistol chapters have cropped up nationwide — a nearly 50 percent increase, Patton told The Blaze.

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Following the shooting, the Pink Pistols urged Americans to focus on the motive of the killings and not the weapon, and she strengthened the call to support gun rights, saying, “No one should be left defenseless.”

Here’s what Patton said in June after the nightclub shooting:

At such a time of tragedy, let us not reach for the low-hanging fruit of blaming the killer’s guns. Let us stay focused on the fact that someone hated gay people so much they were ready to kill or injure so many. A human being did this. The human being’s tools are unimportant when compared to the bleakness of that person’s soul.

Our job now is not to demonize the man’s tools but to condemn his acts and work to prevent such acts in the future.

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