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Rare_Under40Sixty percent of young, self-identified Republicans say that President Barack Obama should be impeached, compared to only 11 percent of Democrats, according to a new poll conducted for Rare.

Independents are also overwhelmingly opposed to impeachment: only 28 percent of them believe it’s a good idea.

As a whole, that means only one-third of young voters support the impeachment of the president, while 58 percent say he shouldn’t be impeached and a further 10 percent are unsure.

The question was asked as part of a first-of-its-kind Rare poll that surveyed only respondents under 40. The questions were tailored to chart trends in the opinions of younger voters.

During the summer, there was chatter of impeachment after some Republicans, including Sarah Palin, issued the call. Republican House Majority Leader John Boehner dismissed such talk, accusing Democrats of using the issue to raise money.

Respondents were also separated by an age gap. Young voters were less likely to support impeachment—only 29 percent of those ages 18-29 were in favor—but older voters warmed more to the idea. Among those ages 36-40, 43 percent wanted to impeach Obama.

The Rare poll also found that another hypothetical presidential race between Obama and Mitt Romney would result in young voters tied between the two candidates. So while the president’s approval ratings have hovered in the forties in other polls, voters seem to see the ballot box as the solution rather than impeachment.

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Republicans cite the Fast and Furious scandal, the Benghazi attack, the IRS targeting scandal, NSA spying and abuses of executive power as reasons to impeach President Obama.

Impeachment must be initiated in the House and passed by a two-thirds majority in the Senate.

The Rare survey was conducted by nonpartisan Gravis Marketing between August 11 and August 18. A total of 556 respondents under age 40 were interviewed over the phone and using Internet panels. Overall, the poll has a margin of error of 5 percent.