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Teacher dies after being caught in the middle of Rogers Park gunfire by ‘L’ stop AP Photo/Joshua Lott
AP Photo/Joshua Lott

Longtime teachers at the Chicago Waldorf School in Rogers Park, Cynthia, and John Trevellion were trying to catch a train at the Morse CTA station a few blocks from their home – to meet up with friends Friday night.

John quickly dropped to the ground when he heard the sound of rapid gunshots but his wife Cynthia, 64, was not so lucky. She was taken to Presence St. Francis Hospital in Evanston where she was pronounced dead. An autopsy determi determined she died of a gunshot wound to the head and neck and her death was ruled a homicide, officials said.

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“I was right beside her. I saw and heard the same gunshots, and I hit the deck before she did. And when she did come down, she had already been shot,” said John, 69, breaking into sobs as he recounted the shooting.

According to police Chief of Patrol Fred Waller during a media briefing at the scene, Cynthia Trevillion was an unintended target caught in the gunfire of a drive-by shooting. Someone who was inside a dark SUV appeared to be aiming for two juveniles who were talking with people inside a car at the intersection of West Morse and North Glenwood avenues, said Ald. Joe Moore, 49th, in an email to constituents.

“Any victim of gun violence is a tragedy, but it is especially tragic and intolerable for an innocent victim to be gunned down on a busy street in the early evening,” Moore said in the email.

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Cynthia and John Trevillion married 29 years ago after meeting at a school in Detroit where they both worked and bonded over their passion for baseball, especially the Cubs – as well as the ideology of Waldorf teaching. John says he remembers her as “bright and cheerful” extrovert who loved cooking healthy food in her free time.

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“She is deeply loved by many, many people and many colleagues and many students,” said John. “Many children whom she taught who are now grown up are going to feel her loss deeply.”

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