Advertisement
Is Houston a template for America’s new demographic landscape? Photo by George Rose/Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX - FEBRUARY 28: A new light rail corridor in downtown is viewed on February 28, 2016 in Houston, TX. Despite the plunge in oil prices, Houston, the corporate energy capital of the U.S., is adding millions of square feet to its convention center and constructing dozens of new highrise office buildings and condominiums. (Photo by George Rose/Getty Images)

Its been known for some time now that Houston is the nation’s most diverse city. Immigrants from all walks of life and ethnic background have flocked to the gulf coast’s largest city for the strong economy and opportunity to grow. The change in Houston’s demographic face has led to the question: is this what all of America will look like in the near future?

RELATED: Border Town and Big City Leaders of Texas Have Serious Thoughts on New Immigration Bill

Houston’s white population has gone down from half to just over a quarter, according to a report by VOA news, while other groups have increased in number since the eighties. The public’s view of immigrants has also changed, with 65 percent of those surveyed by Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research saying they think immigrants give more than they take to the economy.

Political views have skewed from mostly conservative to more liberal as well. Lee Hsia, pastor at Houston’s First Baptist Church in downtown, said in an interview that the city had become “more organically welcoming” in the past five years. That may be due to the recent influx of immigrants, as well as people from around the U.S. with more accepting viewpoints.

As the population around the country becomes more and more diverse, Houston offers a preview of what the rest of the States could be like in a few decades.

RELATED: Chicago Announces Support of Immigrants as Trump Threatens Sanctuary Cities

Stories You Might Like