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Is Marfa, Texas, the most overhyped place in the state? AP Photo/Matt Slocum
**ADVANACE FOR WEEKEND, FEB. 11-12**Site representative Boyd Elder poses in the Prada Marfa store in Valentine, Texas, Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2006. The tiny art sculpture store in the remoteness of West Texas shows off 20 high-heeled women's shoes and a half dozen handbags. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

The Marfa, Texas, hype is real.

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Known for its art scene and, according to legend, alien lights, Thrillist just named the 1,900-person town as the best in Texas:

When modern artist Donald Judd fell in love this desert community in the 1970s, he ended up changing it forever, transforming it into an art hub renowned for its galleries and yearly film and music festivals. Judd’s Chinati Foundation is a necessary pilgrimage for any art aficionado (the drive here is no joke), in addition to the oft-Instagrammed Prada Marfa and amazing restaurants right in the middle of nowhere. After the sun falls, set up a folding chair at the Marfa Lights Viewing Area and watch for flashes (extraterrestrials, maybe?) dancing in the Texas sky. Enjoy a heavy pour of cheap whiskey at Lost Horse Saloon, then lay your head down in a yurt at the oh-so-trendy El Cosmico.

Across the border, Abita Springs, famous nationwide for its brewery, was named the best small town in Louisiana, and Bartlesville, Okla., is the best small town north of Texas, according to the travel blog group.

Thrillist’s website shows characteristics such as “short walks, sunny parks […] [and] unhurried conversations,” were considered in whether a town made the list, but an overarching theme among winners seems to be involvement with a celebrity or national recognition.

While Texans are grateful for any recognition, and the people of Marfa likely agree with their title, be sure you check out the places Beyoncé probably hasn’t visited.

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Making Texas quaint again, y’all!

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