A new technology promisng to lock down buildings and contact law enforcement in the event of an active shooter is reportedly being tested in Houston, following a wave of gun threats made at seven of the city’s schools.

The “Emergency Automatic Gunshot Lockdown” (EAGL) system claims to act as “a fully automated active shooter response system designed to protect the public from active shooter incidents and detect gunfire both indoors and outdoors,” according to the manufacturer’s website.

The manufacturers also claim the system can determine the type and caliber of the weapon being fired based on acoustic analysis. The system will report the data to law enforcement and first responders faster than a call to 911, in much the same way home and business alarm systems function.

The system also can reportedly lock all exterior doors and link to the building’s surveillance camera system and track the shooter throughout the building.

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Inventor John Odell told the station that the school shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newton, Connecticut, in December 2012 inspired him to create the system.

Odell was in Houston to test the system just days after the shooting at a high school in Parkland, Florida. He told a local TV station the EAGL system has undergone successful tests on some school campus, as well as on the New York City subway system.

“In the event there is a shooting incident and our system has been deployed, our system receives that signal, analyzes it and through a dual validation we confirm that it is an actual gunshot,” said Odell.

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Odell also claims that the system is redundant in its firearm detection technology and that it has given “zero false read(s)” throughout the testing phases.

The system is currently being tested at at least one “major local venue,” according to reports. However, Odell has not released the names of these venues or the conditions of the tests.