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On Thursday, NASA officials are reportedly planning to live stream an announcement about the agency’s ongoing hunt for habitable, earth-like planets.

This is leading some to speculation on whether the space agency recently discovered new information about possible alien life, or, at least, a new life for human Earthlings.

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“The discovery was made by researchers using machine learning from Google,” NASA provided in a press release.

NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope first made waves in the space community when it went into use during 2015.

As scientists use the telescope to search for terrestrial plants, like Earth, including those capable of harboring life, alien enthusiasts champion the high-powered mirror as an alien hunter.

While NASA does not directly mention extraterrestrial beings, part of the Kepler’s published goals is to find “planets that are in or near the habitable zone of a wide variety of stars” in the Milky Way Galaxy.

Habitable planets could contain alien life, and, according to Penn State associate professor of astronomy Jason Wright, the Kepler telescope could be the one to detect its presence.

“The idea is that if advanced alien civilizations build planet-sized megastructures – solar panels, ring worlds, telescopes, beacons, whatever – Kepler might be able to distinguish them from planets,” Wright wrote on his Penn State blog.

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As if he could predict the future, NASA is ready to make an announcement, which it is describing as “major.”

According to the space agency, scientists are collaborating with Google to use artificial intelligence technology to search for planets equipped of harboring life.

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Kepler data already shows at least 21 identifiable terrestrial planets in the habitable zone of their star, places where researchers and theorists believe life could exist or be capable of existing.

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A teleconference to announce the new discovery will stream live at nasa.gov/live on Thursday, December 14, beginning at noon CST.

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