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The real love story in “Frozen” was the sisterly bond between Elsa and Anna, but since Anna landed a beau at the end of the movie, fans having been looking forward to Elsa getting her own “happily ever after” in a sequel, and it looks like it may be happening in one very interesting way.

RELATED: “Frozen” Broadway musical just debuted a new song for Elsa

According to the film’s co-director and writer, Jennifer Lee, “Frozen” could potentially see it’s first LGBTQ couple in Elsa and someone else. Lee told the Huffington Post that she’s been actively considering the idea.

“I love everything people are saying [and] people are thinking about with our film ― that it’s creating dialogue, that Elsa is this wonderful character that speaks to so many people,” Lee said. “It means the world to us that we’re part of these conversations.”

“Where we’re going with it, we have tons of conversations about it, and we’re really conscientious about these things…I always write from character-out, and where Elsa is and what Elsa’s doing in her life, she’s telling me every day. We’ll see where we go.”

Fans have been rallying around seeing Elsa with a girlfriend for years and have been gung-ho with the campaign, creating a hashtag #GiveElsaAGirlfriend and spreading petitions across the web.

The movie’s fanatics aren’t holding back with their enthusiasm at the mere potential, with one Twitter user writing, in part, “If this happens I will be trampling children down to see this on opening night.”

It would be historic if Disney firmly went down this pro-LGBTQ route, but it’s not the first time the company has hinted at the inclusion of characters on the LGBTQ spectrum.

Previously, the 2017 live action adaptation of “Beauty and the Beast” saw LeFou dancing with a man, which director Bill Condon called an “exclusively gay moment.”

Christabel is a twenty-something graduate from Virginia Commonwealth University. She's a big fan of writing, television, movies, general pop culture and complaining about how they've annoyed her. Long live the Oxford comma.
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