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This 5-year-old genius explains why things float with no effort on the surface of the Dead Sea

Bordering Israel, the West Bank and Jordan is the famous Dead Sea. If you have ever heard of the Dead Sea, then we’re sure you know the powers that it possesses! If you were to lie on your back while in this famous body of water, you would seemingly float, magically, with no additional effort.

When digging a little deeper into what makes the Dead Sea so spectacular, you’ll find that it’s less about magic and all about science. To show you this, Jessica and Anson are back in action to explain how the Dead Sea works.

To conduct this experiment yourself, you’ll need the following items: 

  • 1 small clear glass
  • 1 separate glass of water
  • LOTS of salt
  • 1 golf ball
  • 1 spoon

Directions: 

  1. Place the golf ball in your empty glass.
  2. Fill the glass almost completely with water.
  3. Gradually add salt and stir! You will need to repeat this until you see the golf ball to rise to the top of the glass.

Anson explains what is happening:

“At first, do you remember when the ball went straight to the bottom of the glass? Well, as we add more salt to the cup, you can see that the golf ball goes up-up-up to the top of the glass. The ball floats in the glass because it has a lower density than the (very) salty water. As we add salt, we’re making the water more and more dense.”

Anson’s Answers features a 5-year-old genius. He has a college-level grasp on various areas of science, dreams of becoming the president and can speak multiple languages. Did you catch that he’s just 5 years old? Anson has a passion for teaching others and loves to share videos explaining the human body, the laws of physics and his ideas for the future. Grab a seat, because Professor Anson’s class is in session!

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Stay in touch with Anson by following him on Facebook! 

Kaitlyn Winey About the author:
Kaitlyn Winey is an associate videographer/editor for Rare. Follow her on Twitter @TheWineyWrapUp.
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