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A teenage boy with a gun was playing Russian roulette by himself and shot and killed himself, according to local police in Sherwood, Ore., KOIN 6 News reported.

The victim, who has yet to be publicly identified, is said to have shown up to a mobile home with a gun. Witnesses told police the teen died while playing Russian roulette by himself.

The boy had already died by the time police and paramedics arrived shortly before 4 a.m. at the Carriage Park Estates, a mobile home community.

Police arrived at the scene believing they were responding to a suicide with a weapon call. A number of 911 callers provided information that he was playing Russian roulette.

Sherwood Police Captain Ty Hanlon provided details at a mid-morning press conference. He said there was at least one “click” of the chamber before the boy shot himself.

Police believe he had a .357 revolver. The gun was not fully loaded. Police don’t yet know where the gun came from or how he acquired it.

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“It appears that he brought a handgun with him and from witnesses account that he was playing a game known as Russian roulette,” Hanlon told KOIN 6 News. “We believe that he showed up and initiated this all on his own.”

Russian roulette is typically describes as spinning the cartridge of a revolver that contains one bullet, pointing the gun at one’s own head and pulling the trigger.

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Police believe the victim had some connection to the people who live in the mobile home. Hanlon, the police captain, told KOIN 6 News that he believes the people who live there are young adults, around 20 years of age.

Investigators are researching the boy’s background to see if he had any suicidal tendencies.

Ken McPherson, a neighbor in the mobile home community, said he didn’t hear the shooting. He said it is common for teenagers to hang out at the home. Although he said there has not been any significant issues occurring there in the past.

“It’s usually kids younger than 20 that I see down there,” McPherson said told KOIN 6 News.

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