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Study Reveals Cleaning Products Could Be Making Children Overweight

Usually, when picking out cleaning products we make sure they are safe by looking at the back and reading the description. After all, we don’t want the chemicals to cause us harm, especially if there are children in the house. The unseen consequences of a child’s health are the worst thing that can happen to a parent. But now, to make the situation a bit more complicated and scarier, a new study has shown that commonly used household cleaners could be making children overweight by altering the gut microbiota.

A new study published by the Canadian Medical Association Journal analyzed the gut flora of 757 infants age 3-4 months and weight at ages 1 and 3 years. Researchers looked at the exposure to detergents, disinfectants, and eco-friendly products used in the home. Fecal samples showed that 3-4-month-old infants who are exposed to antibacterial cleaners weekly have a high level of a type of gut bacteria called Lachnospiraceae, which zaps the extra energy out of food. Lachnospiraceae are more efficient in breaking down food than other species. In result, these babies were more likely to have a high body mass index, and be either obese or overweight by the age of 3.

Anita Kozyrskyj, senior researcher and professor of pediatrics at the University of Alberta in Canada, stated the finding show that parents who use “eco-friendly” cleaning products had babies with lower odds of success weight by age 3. Parents should be aware of how much they are using their disinfectant, after observations were at the high-end of cleanliness, with parents who were cleaning more than weekly, or daily. Kozyrski along with other researchers collected the research by asking mothers about their preferred household cleaners and tracked the weight gain in their children to age 3.

Researches suggested infant exposure to these products likely occur through breathing aerosol spray molecules in the air or by touching surfaces. Some baby wipes also contain these disinfectants. Yet, although research involved three types of cleaning products, they found no connection with detergent.

So, to all mothers out there who worry about these type of cases, and actually follow these studies, what is the best way to avoid your child from becoming overweight? Well, eating healthy should be your number one priority, but scientist state that others who use the eco-friendly products can create a positive result. So, if you aren’t into the whole eco-friendly deal, you might want to stop overusing your cleaning products. No more cleaning for you on a daily basis, Linda!

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Silke  Jasso About the author:
Silke Jasso is a bilingual editor, writer, producer, and journalist specialized in online media. Born in Laredo Texas, her previous works include LareDOS Newspaper where she was an editor and writer and Entravision Communications where she was a Co-Anchor and Multi-Media Journalist for Fox39 News and Univision 27. She recently ...Read more
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