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A San Antonio, Texas, mother wanted to show just how easy it is for someone to walk into a school. And she did just that.

Stacey Alderete’s daughter goes to South San High School. Following last week’s shooting at a Parkland, Florida, high school in which 17 students were murdered, Alderete decided to film herself walking into her daughter’s school to prove a point. She walked in undetected and strolled through the hallways.

“You see those kids broken,” Alderete told ABC News. “I don’t want to see that happen in our district or anywhere else.”

She is now pressing the South San Antonio Independent School District to consider advancing its security measures at all of its schools after she documented how easy it is get inside unnoticed. Alderete, who is a former South San Antonio ISD school board member, shared a series of videos to social media Tuesday showing what she claims is “just how endangered our children are.”

She wore a backpack to look more like a student and is seen in the videos wandering around the school.

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“Half of the campus without being stopped, and I could easily walk in here no problem. All I need to do is open the door … imagine what could’ve happened within this time,” Alderete said in one of the videos. “I could’ve walked in … those are our students in those classrooms.”

She then made her way to the school’s attendance office to share her experience.

She told KSAT-TV: “I was on the campus for approximately 20 minutes (and) when I finished what I did, after I checked in and gave (the administration) my daughter’s slips and stepped out the front doors, my stomach was sick knowing all that was possible,” Alderete said. “It was a very sick feeling had that been somebody with the wrong intentions.”

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The South San school district issued a statement saying that protocol requires all visitors to check in at the front desk.

“Principals are given the discretion to determine which exterior doors must remain locked at all times. Most elementary principals keep all exterior doors locked.  Because of the requirement to change classes every hour at the middle and high school, most secondary schools do not lock most exterior doors, but security cameras and police officers constantly monitor exterior doors,” the district said.

Alderete said that while she served on the school board, she advocated for increased security measures, and now claims that the superintendent wants to scale down on security for next year’s budget.

The district says cutting back on officers stationed at their schools was only part of a discussion.

“Seven million dollars in potential budget reductions were discussed at the last meeting, and these reductions impact many departments and areas in the school district. The police department was only one of many areas discussed. These proposed reductions are simply at the discussion level at this time. Final decisions will be made when the budget is adopted in August,” a district spokesperson told KSAT-TV.