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Texas ranchers are set to be the first to feel the impacts of Trump’s trade policy AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez
Cowboys drive cattle from receding flood waters along Gulfway drive, Monday, Sept. 15, 2008, Near High Island, Texas. Several cattle were lost following the land fall of Hurricane Ike and those that survived were being rounded up and taken to a nearby fresh watering hole where they were also being fed. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

Much like our often-misunderstood political loyalties learned from family and community values, Houstonians innately hate Dallas-…ites? Dallians? What do we call those people?

Whatever they decide, opinion writer Richard Parker of The Dallas Morning News recently raised a few good points about the livelihood of your bar-b-que and all the fixins, including corn and tomatoes.

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Hunkering down for what some fear could become a trade war, Texas’ cattle ranchers and their colleagues across the country are already feeling the impacts of, as Parker calls it, President Trump’s “blundering, blustering trade policy.”

(Do farmers refer to their fellow farmers as colleagues?)

There’s no worse time for a joke, because the livelihood of our nation’s producers are no laughing matter, and Parker predicts that Texas’ ranchers, along with the nation’s farmers’ access to large export markets, like Mexico, are just the tip of the ice burg.

“By sinking the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the new administration cut off long-sought access to the Japanese market,” Parker further explains. “Now banks have raised the conditions for collateral for loans for ranchers.”

Perhaps it’ll be a cold trade war, and we’ll have one pork-related disaster and be done with this.

That was a Bay of Pigs joke.

Trade is still not, though.

Check out Parker’s whole article here.

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