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Minority leader Nancy Pelosi broke records on Wednesday with an eight-hour-long floor speech, but one of her colleagues, Rep. Doris Matsui (D-Calif.), seemed to doze off as Pelosi was delivering her marathon remarks.


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On multiple occasions, cameras caught Matsui nodding off. The first instance came occurred while Pelosi was reading a letter from an immigrant with a passion for technology. As the former Speaker of the House relayed the writer’s words (“In high school, I fell in love with computers and the internet, spending my senior year creating an online newspaper for my school.”), Matsui just couldn’t keep it together.

A YouTube account called GOP War Room posted a video of Matsui nodding off to their channel:

“Fox & Friends” even posted a clip of Matsui’s embarrassing moment to Twitter, setting the footage to Eurythmics’ classic tune “Sweet Dreams.”

Matsui is a long-time lawmaker; the 73-year-old has been in the House since 2005, when she won a special election.

Pelosi’s lengthy speech — which totaled eight hours and six minutes — was a sort of filibuster, though the practice is technically against House rules. However, party leaders are allowed more time on the floor. The loophole is referred to as the “magic minute.” In 2009, then-Minority Leader John Boehner spoke for almost two hours in protest of a Democratic bill aimed at curbing carbon emissions. But the longest House floor speech that we can trace (prior to Pelosi’s) was delivered by Democrat Champ Clark of Missouri in 1909.

And unlike Champ Clarke, Pelosi delivered the speech while wearing 4-inch heels. Which is a pretty impressive feat (pun intended). When the minority leader finally yielded the floor, she received a standing ovation from her Democratic colleagues. Online, support for her effort was also noticeable, as the hashtag #GoNancyGo began trending on Twitter.

In the end, Pelosi’s stunt wasn’t successful in changing the language of the House’s spending bill. The massive document, which rings in 652 pages, does little to protect “Dreamers.”

Rare has reached out to Rep. Matsui’s office for comment.

Alex Thomas About the author:
Alex is from Delaware. He lives in DC.
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