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The chairman and CEO of Dick’s Sporting Goods, the largest sporting goods retailer in America, announced early Wednesday that the company will no longer sell assault weapons, no longer sell high-capacity magazines and no longer sell guns to a person under the age of 21.

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Edward Stack appeared on “Good Morning America” with George Stephanolpoulos and said that the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. directly influenced the decision.

“As we looked at what happened down in Parkland, we were so disturbed and saddened by what happened, we felt we really needed to do something,” the chairman and CEO said.

Stack explained that the company made the decision in no small part because the Parkland shooter, Nikolas Cruz, had purchased a shotgun at a Dick’s store in November.

“When that happened we realized that the system — and we did everything by the book, we did everything that the law required — and still he was able to buy a gun,” Stack said.

When asked if there was any chance the company would reverse this, Stack replied, “Never.”

Dick’s Sporting Goods also released statements on Twitter.

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Stack also wrote in a letter Wednesday that the decision does not mean that the company doesn’t support the Second Amendment.

“We support and respect the Second Amendment, and we recognize and appreciate that the vast majority of gun owners in this country are responsible, law-abiding citizens,” he wrote, according to the Associated Press. “But we have to help solve the problem that’s in front of us. Gun violence is an epidemic that’s taking the lives of too many people, including the brightest hope for the future of America — our kids.”

The company urged lawmakers to “enact common sense gun reform” and ban assault-style weapons, raise the gun-purchasing age to 21, ban bump stocks and high-capacity magazines, create a universal database of people barred from buying a gun, require mental health screenings and police encounter background checks and close the “gun show loophole.”

Matt Naham About the author:
Matt Naham is the Weekend Editor  for Rare. Follow him on Twitter @matt_naham.
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