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Last week, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau led a delegation of 600 people, including more than 125 United Nations ambassadors, to a Broadway play. Ivanka Trump was also invited and in attendance that night.

The play, called “Come From Away,” is the story of a remote Canadian town that welcomed nearly 7,000 stranded travelers after New York was attacked by terrorists on Sept. 11, 2001.

The show is filled with symbolism that points to the importance of welcoming outsiders, a message that is very much at odds with what Ivanka’s father, President Donald Trump, is pushing for with his recent travel bans.


Also in attendance at the show that night was a woman whose name you might not recognize – Diane Davis.

Davis is a resident of the small town in Canada that welcomed the stranded travelers, one of the people on whom the show’s characters are based.

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Davis, along with the other residents of Gander, Newfoundland, welcomed the travelers, showing them kindness and generosity at a time when everything seemed uncertain, especially safety.

During a telephone interview with Rare, Davis, who now works with and advocates for refugees, revealed what she hopes Ivanka took away from the play and possibly relayed to her father.

David said that she hopes Ivanka took away the message that “everyone in the community did the best they could do at the time to provide something to someone in need. […] There’s no need to fear someone because they’re different.”

She added: “I would hope that she saw that every person who was stranded, no matter their religion or their politics or their skin color or their sexual orientation, had the same needs of shelter and food and comfort.”

She also made sure to point out that the show’s message isn’t just important for America, saying, “It’s also an important message for Canada and other countries.”

Davis used her time at the show to advocate for refugees to the Canadian prime minister, telling him that a large portion of the refugees that she works with are fully employed, paying taxes and have integrated well into Canadian life.

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