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Hundreds of thousands of red Skittles covered the road — and that’s not even the weirdest part. NDN/Fans 1st Media, Jukin
"This cow waited for his best friend to roll next to him in their wheelchair. He happily greeted them, but when they said the word, they raced each other side-by-side along the fence."
It started with a road in Dodge County, Wisc., where residents woke up to find hundreds of thousands of sugary candies had spilled on a roadway.
They called the Dodge County Sheriff out to investigate. Dodge County Sheriff (and apparent snack enthusiast) Dale Schmidt told WISN that they positively identified the spilled load as Skittles, telling them, “There’s no little ‘S’ on them, but you can definitely smell, it’s a distinct Skittles smell.” Road crews who cleaned up the spill told CNN that Skittles are good for traction, like road salt. (Another “huh.”)
Read what the sheriff’s office posted on Facebook and tell us if you scratched your head at the same thing we did.
UPDATE: The Skittles were confirmed to have fallen off the back of a truck. The truck was a flatbed pickup and the Skittles were in a large box. Due to it raining at the time, the box got wet and gave way allowing the Skittles to spill out on the roadway. It is reported that the Skittles were intended to be feed for cattle as they did not make the cut for packaging at the company. In the end these Skittles are actually for the Birds!

At 8:51pm on Tuesday night, the Dodge County Sheriff’s Office came across unusual items that were left in the road. Hundreds of thousands of Skittles were spilled on County Highway S near Blackbird Road. It is unclear who may have spilled the skittles on the road. The Dodge County Highway Department was asked to clean them off the road.

While we don’t know who did this, it is certainly clear that it may be difficult to “Taste the Rainbow” in it’s entirety with one color that likely fell off the truck!

Cattle feed? They’re using Skittles for cattle feed?
WBAY reports that it’s a common practice, as candy makers and bakeries sell reject candy to farmers; sugar makes for cheap carbs. It’s been done for some time but gained traction in 2012 as a drought and increasing ethanol production pushed corn prices to historic highs.
Patrick is a content editor for Rare.
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