Advertisement

Eggs are healthy and delicious any time of day, but did you know with just a little vinegar, they can also become a fun toy?


Five-year-old kid genius Anson Wong showed his producer, Jessica, how to dissolve an egg’s shell, leaving behind just the egg’s yolk, held together by the membrane.

RELATED: 5-year-old genius makes “elephant toothpaste” in fun, kid-friendly experiment 

It’s a fun, at-home science experiment that can teach kids a little about chemistry. Grown-ups, you might learn something too!

Here’s what you’ll need for this experiment:

  1. 1 cup vinegar
  2. 1 raw egg
  3. A cup

This experiment is super easy. Simply place the egg inside the cup fill it with vinegar. Make sure the top of the egg is completely covered with the vinegar. Let the egg sit in the cup for at least five hours, or overnight.

After a few hours, you can fish the egg out. You’ll be able to rub off what’s left of the egg’s shell with your fingers. The egg with be squishy. Try bouncing it! The shell-less egg makes a fun bouncy-ball.

When you’re done playing with the bouncy egg, try breaking the membrane open. It’s a fun way to teach kids about the anatomy of an egg.

So how did the eggshell dissolve?

The acetic acid in the vinegar reacts with the calcium in the egg shell. As soon as you pour the vinegar over the egg, you’ll notice small bubbles start to form on the outside of it. Those bubbles are filled with carbon dioxide, a product of the reaction. When the vinegar, also known as acetic acid, comes in contact with the calcium carbonate eggshell, a chemical reaction occurs. The products of the reaction are calcium acetate, water and carbon dioxide.

Anson’s Answers features a 5-year-old genius. He has a college-level grasp on various areas of science, dreams of becoming the president and can speak multiple languages. Did you catch that he’s just 5 years old? Anson has a passion for teaching others and loves to share videos explaining the human body, the laws of physics and his ideas for the future. Grab a seat, because Professor Anson’s class is in session!

Stay in touch with Anson by following him on Facebook! 

Vote for the 2017 Rare Country Awards
Advertisement
Advertisement