Advertisement

The evening of Monday, January 22 marked the 25th anniversary of WWE’s weekly episodic TV show, Monday Night Raw.

To celebrate, the pro-wrestling company aired a very special episode which featured a bunch of legendary wrestlers from the days gone by — wrestling fans are huge suckers for nostalgia!


The 25th anniversary show kicked off with a bang when fans in Brooklyn’s Center witnessed the return of a true pro-wrestling icon, the Texas Rattlesnake himself: Stone Cold Steve Austin.

As the show began, Shane and Stephanie McMahon, the son and daughter of WWE CEO Vince McMahon, were joined in the ring by their old man to commemorate his achievements by presenting him with a plaque.

But Vince was not happy. Despite owning the company in real life, the character he plays in the story lines — often known as Mr. McMahon — is a nasty piece of work. A sick, twisted, ego-maniacal individual who’s obsessed with money and making his enemies suffer.

Needless to say, the plaque was not good enough for him. He began to insult his children and all the fans in attendance.

Enter Vince’s former disgruntled employee Stone Cold Steve Austin.

The crowd erupts as Austin’s music hits, and his fans — of whom there are many — go completely bonkers.

It was Austin’s first appearance on Monday Night Raw since 2015, and he was clearly determined to make it a memorable one, and he looked elated to be dishing out Stone Cold Stunners to both Vince and Shane before downing a few beers and riding off into the sunset once more.

Stone Cold vs. The McMahons is generally considered to be one of the most important rivalries in the history of professional wrestling, and 15 years after Austin hung up his boots for good, it’s still bringing joy to sports entertainment fans across the globe.

Watch the whole scene below:

RELATED: Macaulay Culkin shut it down when asked about his relationship with goddaughter Paris Jackson

Norman is a tall stand-up comedian from the mean streets of London, England. He has performed at several prestigious venues in his brief career, including (but not limited to) The Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, The Capitol City Comedy Club in Austin, and a Hooters in St. Louis. His festival ...Read more
View More Articles
Advertisement
Advertisement