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A familiar Tea Party star may run for Al Franken’s empty Senate seat Win McNamee/Getty Images
TAMPA, FL - SEPTEMBER 12: Republican presidential candidates (L-R) Jon Huntsman, Herman Cain, Rep. Michele Bachmann, Mitt Romney, Gov. Rick Perry, Rep. Ron Paul, Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum participate in a presidential debate sponsored by CNN and The Tea Party Express at the Florida State fairgrounds on September 12, 2011 in Tampa, Florida. The debate featured the eight candidates ten days before the Florida straw poll.. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

A familiar face might be considering a run for the Senate seat freed by the recent resignation of former Minnesota Sen. Al Franken.

Michele Bachmann indicated on a radio show that she’s considered running for the position, reported Right Wing Watch.

Bachmann told the Jim Bakker Show that she recently “had people contact me and urge me to run for that Senate seat.” Since that time, she said she was asking God if doing so would be in his will.

Bachmann said that she was “supposed to run for president” in the 2012 election to highlight certain policy issues.

But was she called to run for Senate? “I don’t know,” she said.

Bachmann was representative for a Minnesota district for several years. She ran in the Republican presidential primary in 2012, but she and others lost to Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney.

RARE POV: Most congressional Republicans prove they are hypocrites on debt and deficits

Franken announced his resignation in early December after several women accused him of sexual misconduct.

Leeann Tweeden, a radio host and former model, was the first to accuse Franken of misconduct in a bombshell account. She said that he “aggressively” stuck his tongue in her mouth after pressuring her to kiss him during a skit rehearsal and groped her breasts while they were both on a United Service Organizations tour in 2006.

A picture of him touching her was also shared with the account.

Since that time, several other women came forward with allegations of inappropriate conduct.

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His final decision came after a number of his Democrat colleagues, beginning with several female senators, publicly called on him to resign.

He gave his final speech later in the month.

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